Saturday, 5 August 2017

When Your Client Doesn't Pay

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If you are an indie writer, chances are you aren't getting a six-figure income from your books alone. It is possible that at some point, you will decide to supplement your income by freelancing, whether it's writing articles,  ghost writing, being a virtual assistant or, like me, providing editing and proofreading services.

Thankfully, up until now I have dealt with nice people who are very scrupulous about paying on time. Having gotten used to this, I admittedly became a little lax about payment terms and conditions, at some point not even clarifying exactly when I expect to be paid. A recent experience with a client who has been dodging my emails for weeks now promptly cured me of this negligent attitude.

Let me just say it once: there are few things more rotten than neglecting to pay a hard-working freelancer who has toiled for weeks or months over a difficult project. There is no excuse to cheating someone just because you can get away with it.

There is some potentially helpful advice on dealing with a client who avoids paying, but it doesn't really apply in my case. The best thing I can do is probably just write this client off, never work for them again, and resolve to be clearer and firmer about terms of payment in the future. Oh, and possibly warn other people about them, because dishonesty is a habit, and if someone cheated you, you can be almost sure they had more people taken in in the course of their career.

So here is my future work policy: I'm not going to just assume everyone is spotlessly honest, especially because I also get commissions from sites like Freelancer, where all sorts of people hang out. I'm going to ask for half the payment once half the work is done (or I might even make third or quarter milestones for larger projects); until that arrives, I will do no more work. I will also limit payment methods to direct transfer and PayPal, to eliminate excuses such as "the check must have been lost in the mail".

Having three young children at home, I am extremely busy, and freelancing for other people cuts into my already limited writing time. The least I can do is ensure that I get paid for every hour I invest in someone else's work.

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