Saturday, 3 June 2017

Writer's burnout: how it came to get me

Image result for writer's burnout
It's really ironic that I let myself become a victim of writer's burnout, when I'm so good at giving sensible advice on avoiding it: treat this as a marathon, write a 1,000 words a day, and you'll be producing at a respectable pace. 

Still, I guess we all get carried away from time to time. 

So, in addition to trying to put in a 1,000 words a day on two WIPs, I was also working on getting The Landlord ready for publication in July, doing promotion for my other books, querying for a middle grade fantasy novel, and working on editing and proofreading other people's books. 

Others might pull this off with relative impunity, but you have to remember that both my husband and I work from home and homeschool three young children. I don't have my own private work space. This means everyone is in my hair every day and all day long. 

I wrote on my phone while trying to get my youngest to sleep (so far I haven't found a better way than lying down next to him and quietly stealing out of the room when he's asleep). I wrote while at the playground with my kids, while other moms gossiped and exchanged recipes. I stopped answering phone calls from friends. I began resenting my human needs to eat, sleep and go to the bathroom. I won't tell you how long I have gone without washing my hair because I don't want to shock you. 

Naturally, you can only go on like this for so long. 

I became twitchy and irritable. My hands would begin to shake when I picked up my phone to check my email. I could no longer enjoy a good book or simply relax. Worst of all, I began having fantasies about some distant future time when I won't have to write a single damn thing ever again. 

And this is when I realized something is very wrong, because writing has always been a creative outlet and a source of satisfaction for me, and now it has become a burden. 

I had to slow down unless I wanted to end up with a neurosis. I knew it, and a few decisions helped:

The first was relatively easy to make. I decided I'm not going to take on any more editing projects in the near future. As flattering as it is when people contact me spontaneously and tell me they'd love me to work on their books, there's only so much of me to go around. Same goes for beta-reading and reviewing. 

The second decision, also a no-brainer, was pulling back from social media and forums. 

The third involved some introspection and ego killing. I came to terms with the fact that nobody really cares whether my next book is released now or six months from now. Actually, most people don't care whether there is a next book at all. So there's no point killing myself over something that might as well be done in a relaxed manner. 

The effects were almost immediate. I began enjoying reading and writing again within a very short span of time. So now it's back to my old reasonable 1K words per day, sanity, and undisturbed sleep. 

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